Crystal Coin & Collectibles

FAQ

Q:  How much are my coins worth?
A:  It all depends on the condition, mint mark, and date of your coins.  All 10 cent, and 25 cent coins dated 1964 and before have silver content and their value is based on the spot price of silver.  All 50 cent coins dated 1964 and before also have silver content and will be based on the spot price of silver.  Kennedy Half Dollars dated 1965-1970 are part silver and their price is determined by the spot price of silver.  The best thing to do is just bring all of your coins in and have our experts sort them for you.  There is no charge for this service.


Q:  What are Wheat Pennies Worth? 
A:   Common date wheat back pennies in average circulated condition are worth 2.5 cents per coin.  These coins are sold in bulk and are purchased and sold at set prices.  Wheat cents dated 1909-1915 with mint marks (P,D, & S) will have premium values.  Other Wheat pennies such as 1914-D, 1922 no mint mark, 1924-D, and 1931-S are rare dates and must be looked at to determine value.


Q:  Is there any paper money that has any value?
A:  All US paper money with a "series date" 1957 and before will have collector value.  1935 and 1957 silver certificate $1.00 bills are fairly common and gernerally are purchased in average circulated condition for $1.10 per note.  Better condition can increase the value.  1928 and 1934 $1.00 silver certificates have a premium based on condition.  There are also $5.00 and $10.00 silver certificates whose premium value will be based on condition.  $2.00 bills with red seal and red serial numbers will have a premium value.  All modern issue $2.00 Federal Reserve notes with green seal and green serial numbers gernerally have no value over face value.  There are exceptions to this, if your note has a star in the serial number, a low serial number, a fancy serial number, or misprint. These notes must be looked at to determine value.  $5.00 red seal and red serial number notes will have value based on condition.  Most Federal Reserve notes (those with green seals and green serial numbers) generally do not have much collector interest.  Federal Reserve notes come in all denominations from $5.00-$100.00 dollars.  If your note is dated 1928 then we should look at it to see if it has value.  Once again, there are exceptions to this rule : if your note has a star in the serial number, a low serial number, a fancy serial number, or misprint it could have value.  All large size U.S. currency (the physical size of the paper the note is printed on) will have value. The best rule of thumb is to bring all of your old paper money in and have our experts sort through it for anything of value.  There is no charge for this service.


Q:  How do you determine the value of my collectibles?
A:  In most cases value is determined by age and condition.  We have over 30 years experience in the collectibles market place and we are recognized experts in a number of collectible fields. Our experts are not only dealers but in many cases are long time collectors.  We know the market and we know where to go for information.  Our buy and sell prices are the most competitive in the industry.  With regard to rare coins and paper money we use the industry standard price guides and reference books. Our honesty, integrity, and knowledge are well known throughout the community and industry.   


Q:  Do you buy and sell bullion?
A:  We normally do not keep positions in gold and silver bullion due to market volatility.  However,  we are able to obtain virtually anything you want in bullion for delivery within a matter of hours.  In many cases  we may have limited amounts of gold and silver on hand at any given time.


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